cenote diving

Cenote Diving

Diving the Cenotes

cenote diving

Cenote Diving

Cenote El Pit Jungle Divers Cozumel

10 Reasons to Dive the Cenotes with Jungle Divers Cozumel

It’s amazing ! You too can experience these mystical places. You need to be at least 12 or 15 years old and have excellent buoyancy. A Refresher dive may be required. 

You have to experience these bucket list dives. Journey into ancient tunnels, stunning sinkholes and abysmal pits. Every Lara Croft and Indiana Jones will feel right at home.

With your breathing as the only sound, the mesmerizing light effects and the inviting shadows inducing a trance like state that will take you back to very ancient and mystical times.

Cavern diving is done within the limits of light penetration and it’s a very good thing. Most cenotes will display dazzling effects from laser beams to heavenly rays. Let there be light !

The reason I cenote dive ! The cenotes are filled with shell and coral fossils dating back millions of years. Stalactites and other formations hundreds of thousands years old. Animal & human bones from tens of thousands of years ago. We got the ages covered.

The history starts many millions of years ago. The most interesting times are the last Ice Age when ancient people and mega beasts ruled these primeval lands. For the Maya, these mysterious places was Xibalba, the Mayan underworld.

Ahhh ! No salt, no sticky smelly hair, no burning eyes and mmmmm tastes good ! The cool & refreshing water is perfect for the hot & humid Yucatan jungle but you still might want to wear a 3mm full wetsuit, just sayin’.

Over or under, the jungle is filled with an amazing variety of animals that can be observed safely. Cenotes are filled with turtles, catfish, cyclids, mollys, eels, crustaceans and the ever elusive Aluxes !

Enter the twilight zone ! Two worlds, one salty one sweet. 

Smoke on the water ! Looks like milk, smells like ancient eggs.

The layered cocktail of the gods !

Water Water Everywhere ! You just can’t see it, want to know how it feels to fly ?

cenote diving

cenote diving

Cenote Chac Mool & Kukulcan

Cenotes Kukulcan and Chac Mool will introduce the first timers to a very safe, easy and fascinating set of dives. These cenotes display mesmerizing light shows, ancient fossils & crystals, varied speleotherms and mystical halocline & hydrogen sulfide effects.

Minimum Age:12
CertificationOpen Water Diver
Level:Very Easy

Maximum Depth:

14 metres / 46 feet
Highlights:Light, Fossils, Speleotherms, Halocline, Hydrogen Sulfide, Airdome, Animals.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Restaurant, Souvenirs, Very Nice Toilets, Changing Rooms and a Shower.
Cameras:None Allowed ! Professional Photographer on Site.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 150

Cenote Diving

Cenote Chikin Ha

Cenote Chikin Ha is a fascinating place nestled in a jungle brimming with inviting water holes and pleasant paths.  Both dives start in Cenote Chikin Ha through an enormous tunnel and end in Cenote Rainbow, where you will surface in a mystical cave filled with sun rays bursting through sweet incense mist. It is very common to witness among a multitude of lit candles, a Mayan shaman performing ancient mystical ceremonies. If you look closely, you can see many unique fossils and crystals scattered all over, like very delicate urchin skeletons, millions of years old

Minimum Age:12
CertificationOpen Water Diver
Level:Very Easy
Maximum Depth:14 metres / 46 feet
Highlights:Sun Rays, Fossils, Crystals, Halocline, Animals.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Restaurant, Souvenirs, Nice Toilets, Changing Rooms and Showers.
Cameras:All Cameras Allowed.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 150

Cenote Diving

Cenote Eden (Ponderosa)

Cenote Eden is a truly amazing water hole ! We start off in Cenote Eden through a massive tunnel to end in Cenote Corral, a beautiful mangrove swamp that’s bathed in sun rays piercing the crystal clear water. Towards the end of the line you will see piles of fossilized conch shells millions of years old. This package includes another cenote dive you need to choose : Tajma Ha, Chikin Ha or Chac Mool.

Minimum Age:12
CertificationOpen Water Diver
Level:Very Easy
Maximum Depth:14 metres / 46 feet
Highlights:Sun Rays, Fossils, Speleotherms, Halocline, Animals, Beautiful Swimming Area.
FacilitiesSetup Tables, Jungle Toilets, Resting Areas.
Cameras:All Cameras Allowed.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 165

Cenote Diving

Cenote Tajma Ha

Tajma Ha dive is a series of 4 stunning cenotes filled with ancient fossils of shells, corals & urchins, dazzling light effects and we surface in two of the air domes filled with bats, roots and stalactites ! Sure to bring out the Lara Croft or Indiana Jones in you ! Can be dived in combination with Chac Mool, Chikin Ha or Eden for $25 extra.

Minimum Age:12
CertificationOpen Water Diver
Level:Very Easy
Maximum Depth:15 metres / 50 feet
Highlights:Light, Fossils, Speleotherms, Halocline, Airdome, Animals.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Souvenirs, Jungle Toilets and Changing Rooms.
Cameras:Small Cameras Allowed. Pro Level Cameras Need to Pay $50 Extra. Professional Photographer for Hire.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 150

Cenote Diving

Cenote Dos Ojos

Cenote Dos Ojos is my favorite. It’s a very ancient cave system and we’re lucky enough to dive it ! The Barbie Line is filled with spacious twisting tunnels, massive speleotherms and beautiful light effects. The Batcave Line is filled with silt dunes and very young crystal speleotherms that glitter with light glowing through and then we surface inside a massive and mystical bat filled cave. Dos Ojos is part of Sac Actun, the longest water filled cave system in the world !

Minimum Age:12
CertificationOpen Water Diver
Level:Intermediate
Maximum Depth:9 metres / 30 feet
Highlights:Light, Fossils, Speleotherms, Airdome, Animals.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Restaurant, Souvenirs, Jungle Toilets, Changing Rooms and Showers.
Cameras:Small Cameras Allowed. Pro Level need to pay $50 Extra. Professional Photographer for Hire.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 175

Cenote Diving

Cenote Dreamgate

Cenote Dreamgate is a stunning a very unique sinkhole. There are two lines and both can be easily done in one dive. The longest line will take you through vast dunes of ancient silt, an airdome with points of light and huge amounts of speleotherms. The short line will take you through tunnels of delicate crystal formations. For expert cenote divers due to being dark, silty and has smaller passages. Cenote experience required. Can be combined with Dos Ojos for $25 extra.

Minimum Age:12
CertificationOpen Water Diver
Level:Very Easy
Maximum Depth:14 metres / 46 feet
Highlights:Light, Fossils, Speleotherms, Halocline, Hydrogen Sulfide, Airdome, Animals.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Restaurant, Souvenirs, Very Nice Toilets, Changing Rooms and a Shower.
Cameras:None Allowed ! Professional Photographer on Site.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 175

Cenote Diving

Angelita & Carwash (Aktun Ha)

Cenote Angelita is a deep pit 180 feet / 55 meters deep. The star of this show is the ghostly 10 feet / 3 meters thick hydrogen sulfide cloud floating around a mound, thick with debris, down 100 feet /33 meters. It really looks like you are flying above a gloomy forest’s foggy river straight out of one of Grimm’s fairy tales !

Cenote Carwash is a shallow pond filled with water lillies, colorful fresh water fishes and beautiful UW sceneries, perfect for photography. There is also a beautifully decorated cavern part that goes down 50 feet / 15 meters.

Minimum Age:15
CertificationAdvanced Open Water Diver
Level:Advanced
Maximum Depth:

Angelita: 130 feet / 40 meters

Carwash: 15 metres / 50 feet

Highlights:Light, Fossils, Speleotherms, Halocline, Hydrogen Sulfide, Airdome, Animals and Water Lillies.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Jungle Toilets.
Cameras:Small Cameras Allowed. Pro Level need to pay $50 Extra.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 200

Cenote Diving

Cenote Zapote (Hells Bells) & Kin Ha

Cenote Zapote is over 200 feet deep with unique bell shaped formation hanging at 100 feet / 33 meters and bathed in an eerie layer of hydrogen sulfide. These Bells from Hell are actually made of bacteria and grow underwater !

Kin Ha is a covered pit 200 feet / 60 meters deep with interesting bubble & bell shaped formations and crystal covered shells. Beautiful laser beam effects around noon.

 

Minimum Age:15
CertificationAdvanced Open Water Diver
Level:Advanced
Maximum Depth:40 metres / 130 feet
Highlights:Halocline, Hydrogen Sulfide, Bell Formations, Fossils.
FacilitiesSet Up Tables, Restaurant, Nice Toilets and Changing Rooms.
Cameras:Small Cameras Allowed. Pro Level need to pay $50 Extra.

What’s Included…

  • Return Transport from the Playa Del Carmen Ferry to the Cenotes.
  • Cenote Entrance Fees.
  • Experienced & Knowledgeable Certified Instructor / Guide.
  • Flashlights.
  • Tanks & Weights.
  • Snacks & Drinks.
  • Lunch at a Traditional Mexican Restaurant, No Soggy Sandwiches…

What’s not Included…

  • Ferry Ride From Cozumel to Playa del Carmen ( $20 ).
  • Dive Equipment & Wetsuits.

$ 225

Cenote Diving

What are Cenotes ?

Cenote diving is unique to the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. What are cenotes?

The word “CENOTE” (Say-No-Tay) originates from the Mayan word “T’DZONOT” which means “Cave with Water” or “Sacred Well”. The Spanish conquistadors gave the word a Spanish twist when they met the Mayas in the early 1500’s.

Cenotes are sinkholes, the given scientific name is “karst window“. They are formed by the dissolution of the limestone bedrock from the mildly acidic rain and the flowing of fresh water through the Great Mayan Aquifer, one of the largest underground water system in the world!

When Were Cenotes Formed ?

The history of the Yucatan Peninsula begins during the Paleozoic Era (500-250 millions of years before present) when earth was still one mega continent called Pangaea and the sediments that make up the base of the peninsula were deposited.

From the Cretaceous (145-66 millions of years before present) to the Pleistocene (1.8 millions of years before present) the Yucatan Peninsula had several marine transgressions, covering the land with a warm thriving shallow ocean. 

During these times, sediments were deposited from the remains of ancient animals, corals and sand producing thousands of meters deep of porous limestone. 

At the beginning of the last Ice Age, 2.5 millions of years before present, the oceans’ water level fluctuated many times and about 1.8 millions of years ago, the Yucatan Peninsula began emerging from the ocean, exposing a thick limestone bedrock to the elements. 

It’s during this time that most cenote systems began to form by water pooling on the surface and slowly dissolving the limestone creating tunnels of flowing water. Through time, the porous limestone and the fluctuating water levels created the massive caves and sinkholes we know today as cenotes.

What's Up with the Asteroid ?

Around 66 millions of years ago, an asteroid 11km in diameter crashed on the northern tip of the Yucatan, in what is today the town of Chicxulub near Merida. It produced a crater 150km in diameter and 20km deep. Most importantly, the event killed 75% of life on earth, caused the extinction of the dinosaurs and the massive shock wave created tremendous earthquakes and cracked the Yucatan bedrock causing fault lines and fissures in the compact limestone. 

Satellite imagery clearly shows a ring of cenotes around what used to be the high ridges of the crater rings.

Who Used the Cenotes ?

In ancient times, when they were dry, cenotes have been used for protection against predators, the elements and the source of fresh water pooling on the bottom of these caves in the absence of rain. Prehistoric animals and then early humans lived and died in these caves and since divers starting visiting these places, hundreds of animal fossils, human bones and artifacts from the last Ice Age have been found.

Because the cenotes, with the rain, are the only sources of fresh water in the northern part of the Yucatan, all animals and human civilizations in this area used these cenotes to survive.

The civilization with the most impact were the Mayans. To the Mayans, these caves were sacred for the life the water sustained but they were also the entrance to the underworld Xibalba, the place Mayan souls went after death. Some cenotes like the one in Chichen Itza were used for ceremonials and sacrifices to the god of rain Chaac. 

Many cenotes contain ceramics, tools and bones of the Mayan but also of very ancient prehistoric animals and humans. It is of the utmost importance you do not touch or retrieve any fossils, artifacts, geological formations or anything else from the cenotes. The retrieval of ANYTHING is immoral, illegal and punishable by law with heavy fines and prison sentences.

Please RESPECT these stunning sacred places.

Cenote Diving Rules

Cavern diving is very safe activity only if all safety protocols and rules are followed by all at all times.

cenote rules picto

No equipment dangling, no snorkels, no accessories, no knives, no gloves, no touching NOTHING, no graffitis and no disturbing ANYTHING

cenote air rule

Rule of Thirds: One third to go in, one third to come out, one third as contingency. You must signal your guide when you reach 2000psi/140bar and 1000psi/70bar.

cenote group rule

Guide always in front, divers in order of experience, 2m/6ft apart always leveled. When crossing other group, all divers on the right of the line, flashlights down.

cenote line rule

Stay close to the guide line maintaining a visual reference on it at all times, no more than 1m/3ft away from the line. If the line stops, TURN AROUND!

cenote buoyancy rule

Buoyancy control is most important. Frog kick and stay 2m/6ft of the bottom. Be quick to adjust your buoyancy when going up or down to avoid crashing.

cenote light rule

You must always see light from an exit. When dark cover your light and you should see the exit. You should never be in total darkness.

cenote rule restriction

No restrictions allowed, the tightest passage must be at least two divers high, two divers wide, making it easy to turn around

cenote limit rule

Maximum distance from open water is 60m/200ft. When you encounter these signs, never go past them.

cenote warning sign

Cenote Facts

  • Caverns in this area started to form 1.8 million years ago.
  • They were formed by the dissolution of limestone by contact with the slightly acidic rain.
  • During the last Ice Age, these caves were dry. Animals and humans took shelter in them. Many caves contain fossils of ancient humans & animals.
  • To the Mayans, cenotes were sacred entrances to the Mayan underworld: Xibalba.
  • Cenotes, with the rain, are the only sources of fresh water on the Yucatan Peninsula. There are no rivers or lakes, the limestone is too porous.
  • There are thousands of cenotes and thousands of miles of these tunnels in the Yucatan Peninsula.
  • The Sac Actun System, which includes the Dos Ojos cenotes is the longest underwater system in the world with 364 km of tunnels and caves.
cenote tajma ha

Cavern Diving Facts

  • Cavern diving is a safe and once in a lifetime experience if all rules and regulations are observed by all.
  • When cavern diving, you should always see light from the exit.
  • Maximum penetration distance is a linear 200 feet / 60 meters from the surface.
  • Always follow a guide line no more than 3 feet / 1 meter away so you can use it as a physical guide if you lose all visibility.
  • NEVER let any cenote guide take you away from the line if you don't see the exit or the surface unobstructed and in plain view.
  • Most important rule in cavern diving is that anybody, at any time, for any reason can stop the dive. If you don't feel safe, call it !
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